Explain why it is crucial to know the audience, mission, and outcomes of an organization when writing a program evaluation report.

Re:Module 7 DQ 2

Explain why it is crucial to know the audience, mission, and outcomes of an organization when writing a program evaluation report.

When writing a program evaluation report, it is critical that the evaluator know the audience they will be addressing, the mission of the organization and the outcomes of the evaluation. Knowing the audience is important so that the report can be written in a way that the people receiving the report will understand it. Individuals at different levels of an organization will have different understandings of what is being addressed. This also allows the evaluator to address the specific concerns or expectations of the particular audience (King & Cooksy, 2008). Knowing the mission of an organization allows the evaluator to directly relate all analyzed data back to the mission. Since an organization should be meeting its intended goals, all goals are based on the mission of the organization (Cooper & Faircloth, 2006). The evaluator can determine if the goals are being meet or if there is room for improvement. The outcomes of the evaluation are important to all individuals involved in the organization. The outcomes of the evaluation are what allow the individuals within the organization to make decisions that may change how the organization is run, how it spends its funding, or how a specific program is implemented (King & Cooksy, 2008). By understanding how all of the outcomes come together allow decision makers to decide what needs to be done to make the organization better.

References:

Cooper, N., & Faircloth, C. (2006). Repositioning Campus Recreation: A Case Report on Designing Program Evaluation Procedures. Recreational Sports Journal, 30(2), 126-135. Retrieved from: https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=s3h&AN=23103631&site=eds-live&scope=site

King, N. J., & Cooksy, L. J. (2008). Evaluating Multilevel Programs. New Directions For Evaluation, (120), 27-39. Retrieved from: https://lopes.idm.oclc.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eric&AN=EJ824984&site=eds-live&scope=site

Alice Benningfield
1 posts
Re:Module 7 DQ 1
As a program evaluator, how would you achieve maximum readability and potential for change when writing a program evaluation report? Defend your ideas.
The evaluation report consists of the findings, conclusion, and recommendations, and consists of recommendations that can be used to improve the process of decision-making. Therefore, when writing an evaluation report as a program evaluator, you must ensure that you achieve maximum readability and the potential for change. For this to happen, the evaluator must know the audience. It is necessary to understand who are the intended users or stakeholders that will be using the findings. It is also important to use plain language instead of technical language, and to make sure the report is culturally appropriate for the audience. By allowing selected stakeholders to review the results before completing the report can also allow the evaluator to see other perspectives not previously seen (Powell, 2006). Without understanding who the audience is, it may be difficult to ensure the audience would understand all the areas that need change, how it can be changed for the better, solutions to the problem, and who is responsible for the implementation of change (Powell, 2006). The program evaluation report must be consistent so that the evaluation is not confusing.
Powell, R. R. (2006). Evaluation research: An overview. Library Trends, 55(1),102-120. The Johns Hopkins University Press. doi: 10.1353/lib.2006.0050

Tonya Klemmer
1 posts
Re:Module 7 DQ 1
As a program evaluator, how would you achieve maximum readability and potential for change when writing a program evaluation report? Defend your ideas.
In order to achieve maximum readability and potential for change I would first report the reasons the evaluation was requested.  Next it is important to include the issues that were discovered in the evaluation process backing up the information with identifiable information regarding these problems that came out of the evaluation process.  It can be very helpful to include graphs and tables that can back up the information you are presenting.  It is also important that the audience being given this information is well understood by the evaluator.  This can help to be sure the evaluator provides information in a manner that will make sense to the audience.   I would make a list of the top most important things that need to be shared with the audience.  A reported by Royse, Thyer and Padgett (2016), do not fall into the trap of trying to report every statistically significant correlation or t-test.  Most stakeholders are not going to be interested in this information, nor will they understand it in most circumstances.  As reported by Cooper and Faircloth (2006), in the process of identifying immediate, intermediate, and long-term outcomes, campus recreation departments can assess the genuineness of its mission and conceptual strength of contribution to the college’s or university’s mission.  Bringing the information back to the mission and objectives of the agency or organization can help to achieve the maximum potential for change.
Cooper, N., & Faircloth, C. (2006). Repositioning Campus Recreation: A Case Report on Designing Program Evaluation Procedures. Recreational Sports Journal, 30(2), 126-135.
Royse, D., Thyer, B. A., & Padgett, D. K. (2016). Program evaluation: An introduction (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. ISBN-13: 9781305101968

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